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Stained Glass Design, Step-By-Step

Do you know the difference between a sketch and a scale design; between a stained glass cartoon and a cutline? Do you plan how to choose glass? Do you know how to translate a photograph or pencil drawing into stained glass? If you are a glasspainter, do your drawings show what is tracing and what is matting?

Do you know how to accurately measure a window opening; take templates; make full-size shop drawings? What if your window needs support bars or has curved perimeters? Are you consistent in coding perimeter lines to prevent installation errors? Is it easy to decide where to position bars and leadlines?

If you're dedicated to making good stained glass but have answered 'no' to most of these questions, don't worry. I am offering a specialized drawing workshop that shows how to design and build stained glass windows according to a logical, repeatable, step-by-step process.

So how do you birth an idea? Well, drawing is fundamental.

Aside from imagery and subject matter, there are four key visual components to stained glass: colour, line, value and transparency. Exploring options in all these areas is an important part of the creative process, and it's difficult to do this when ideas are still floating around inside your head. This is where design drawing comes in; making sketches, working to scale, drawing a cutline, and, in the case of painted stained glass, making a full-sized black and white drawing.

And how do you build a window that fits properly; is structurally sound; and works successfully within it's architectural setting? Again, drawing is the key. It's much easier to progress smoothly through the manufacturing process (saving time, materials and costly errors) when technical information is clearly set out on paper beforehand. These are called shop drawings.

Even if you use a computer to do artwork, learning the traditional design procedure, and understanding the purpose of various drawings, may be helpful.

Teaching will be via Powerpoint presentation, hands-on drawing exercises and group discussion.

5-day workshop. All levels. Readsboro, Vermont,
September 17-21, 2018.
Tuition $825 includes lunches and materials. |Email|dcoombs@myfairpoint.net| any questions.